6 Ways to Avoid Blogger Burnout Comments76 Comments

Check out my new guide for starting a blog to learn how to go about properly creating your own blog.

Sorry but my Wednesday blogging tips post is a tiny bit late this week.

Late last night I got back from a camping trip that capped off an awesome birthday weekend. In the rush to get everything organized for the trip and make the most out of the whole weekend, I just didn’t have the time to get a Tuesday and Wednesday post scheduled ahead of time.

This situation got me thinking a lot more about managing a blog and balancing it with a satisfying lifestyle.

First, here are some recent blogging tips posts to check out if you are new to this weekly blogging tips series:

And now onto this week’s blogging tip…

How To Avoid Blogger Burnout

One thing I have seen time and time again during my blogging journey is new bloggers going gung ho early on only to eventually hit a wall. They get so caught up chasing stats and trying to build up their blog asap that they just find it impossible to maintain that frenetic pace. I’ve even experienced it first hand myself.

It’s not that blogging is some super stressful hobby or side business. It’s more that it can be so time consuming and that there is always more to do. So if you’re not careful you can get overwhelmed by the dreaded blogger burnout.

If you’re really enjoying blogging, you can usually get back on the horse soon enough. Unfortunately I see too many bloggers just drop off the map soon after. So hopefully these tips help new bloggers maintain their momentum and keep their blogs going long term.

Taking Breaks

Early on when I was blogging, I put in a ton of time. My entire life revolved around my blog. A day wouldn’t go by when I wasn’t spending at least a few hours on my blog, but usually it was pretty much the whole day. Doing this with nearly anything is bound to lead to burnout. So of course it’s not any different with blogging.

Eventually I realized that sometimes you just need some breaks away from it all. Then you can clear your mind a bit and come back revitalized with new found energy.

Different people probably need different kinds of breaks and of varying lengths. For me I find a day or two away does wonders. That might be an out of town road trip, a weekend hanging out with friends or just some time on my own doing things I enjoy.

The key is that you you truly take a mental break and that you avoid getting into a monotonous routine. You don’t want to end up just punching the clock each day with your blogging activities. You really need time to balance your life with other things that make you happy. As much as I love blogging, the break this past weekend was priceless.

Blogging On Your Schedule

Part of the reason new bloggers tend to avoid taking breaks is that they are led to believe that they have to maintain a specific schedule. They might’ve read that bloggers need to establish a set schedule or they get forced to post a certain amount of times each week for blogger challenge groups.

Really though, what’s the worst that can happen if you miss posting some days? Will all your readers and blogger friends abandon you for not providing reading material that day? Will the blogging gods strike down on your blog for not following some code of blogging ethics? While some consistency is important as things build up more, it just doesn’t matter as much as people are led to believe, especially early on.

So I’m not saying throw away the concept of having a blogging schedule. Just don’t get stressed out if your schedule occasionally strays a bit. Any true blogger friends and loyal readers will appreciate that you need breaks and that life is more important. You are not running some newspaper that will get countless angry phone calls if they don’t get their daily fix.

Set Realistic Commitments

As your blog gets going, you’ll find that all kinds of commitments build up. First there is the assumed commitment of posting on a certain schedule. Then there is the commitment to regularly read and comment on your friends’ blogs. These kinds of commitments really should have some degree of flexibility. It’s great if you can be loyal, but don’t feel bad about missing a day here and there.

There are some commitments which do require more dedication such as when you agree to guest post or host a blog carnival. For those you will want to stick to your word to maintain a strong reputation.

The trick is to not take on more commitments than you can realistically keep up with. If you are finding it difficult to keep up with it all, you have likely committed to too much. Then comes the tough choices of deciding how to scale back.

Connect With Like Minded Bloggers

This was covered in last week’s blogging tips post about blogger networking. To make your blogging less like work, you will want to surround yourself with blogger contacts who you can relate to and enjoy connecting with.

When a lot of your marketing involves connecting with people you like, the easier it becomes to work on your blog. The last thing you want is for your blogging to feel like a chore. It should feel like a hobby even if you are using it to make money.

So if a blogger rubs you the wrong way or they’re a straight up asshole, just move on. There are enough bloggers out there that you simply don’t need to waste your time on those types.

Stay True To Yourself

With blogging there aren’t really any rules set in stone. Sure there are some basic etiquettes to follow, but for the most part, you are free to run things how you please. Just because some other blogger has found something that works for them, it doesn’t mean that you have to follow the herd. Do what feels right for you and what keeps you most satisfied with your blog.

So if you want to stray a bit with the niche of your blog, go for it. Do keep your readers in mind though. Be aware that you may lose some readers if you stray too much. At the same time, the new direction might attract an even better audience. Go with your heart.

Stay true to yourself with your marketing too. Don’t feel obligated to comment on posts that don’t interest you. Don’t jump on every marketing strategy just because people say it’s what you’re ‘supposed’ to do.

Remember It’s Not A Race

Chasing stats can provide some motivation with blogging, but don’t get caught up competing with other bloggers’ stats. There will always be someone who can commit more time, someone with more experience, someone with better writing and so on.

In my case I had plenty of time available and lots of website marketing experience. Still, I would get a bit jealous when the better written blogs would get more exposure. Why should it matter to you how quickly other blogs’ develop though?

Each blog develops at its own pace. So don’t get discouraged if your blog is growing slower than your friends’ blogs. Since a blog is always an ongoing project, remember that there is no finish line. There is no pressure to reach certain stats at specific times. Just put in the amount of time and effort that keeps you happy. Your blogging journey is only as satisfying as you make it.

What do you do to avoid blogger burnout?

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This entry was posted in Blogging, and tagged , Comments76 Comments
By : Jeremy Biberdorf | 5 Sep 2012
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76 thoughts on “6 Ways to Avoid Blogger Burnout

    1. Jeremy

      That relaxation time is quite crucial. I assume most of us are into blogging for the long term. So it needs to be treated more like a marathon than a sprint. Pace yourself so that you have the energy and motivation to keep pushing forward month to month.

      Reply
      1. Nurse Frugal

        Wow…..found this article through Mr. CBB’s page and it is a definite must-read! Taking breaks is crucial and I just barely started realizing that…..my life was totally revolving around my blog and that’s just not healthy! Great pointers!!!

        Reply
  1. L Bee and the Money Tree

    I was juuuuuust about to do a blogger burnout post last week, but then I got..well ya know burnt out. Haha. Great tips. It’s something I’ve had to realize especially in going back to work that I have to do what I can, when I can and not stress out about what isn’t getting done. I’ll go mad if I do.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Well don’t let my post stop you from covering that topic. It’s always good to read someone else’s view on topics. I know blogging stress can really magnify when you go back to work. I dealt with that kind of thing when I stated work again this summer. Luckily I work from home which makes it a lot easier to still fit in blogging time.

      Reply
    1. Jeremy

      If you do get burnt out a lot you might want to try some of these other strategies. The occasional break is important, but ultimately you should be enjoying what you’re doing on a daily basis.

      Reply
  2. TB at BlueCollarWorkman

    TAking time off is really important, I agree, and so you going camping (happy birthday!) and breathing a few days, is perfectly acceptable. And look, we’re all still here. I find that pre-setting up posts works best for me. I do that, then read lots of blogs during the week on my work breaks, but any time I’m getting overwhelmed or like it’s all mushing together, I just stop for awhile. A day, two days, sometimes a week. Our actual physical and mental health seem more important than our blogs health, right?

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Yes scheduling some posts ahead of time does make the break a lot easier to manage. I would’ve had more scheduled if I hadn’t been so busy the week before. Lately I’ve just been writing all posts the day before though. Really I should get a queue built up though. Our health is definitely a lot more important. So even if your blog isn’t fully prepared for a break, be sure to take the time to look after yourself. That break will also help keep your blog going long term.

      Reply
    1. Jeremy

      That must be one advantage of being a blogging duo. If one person is feeling burnt out, the other can step up and take care of some of those responsibilities. Plus all the work would be split up between 2 people anyway.

      Reply
  3. Jacob @ iHeartBudgets

    For me, my stress doesn’t come from burnout, but from the fact that I don’t have a bunch of posts pre-written, and I end up writing until midnight the night before it’s live. I just can’t seem to get ahead of this thing, but I think it really reflects my priorities. It’s sunny out and friends and family want to hang out, so I go do that instead of staying inside and writing. I think i’ll catch up once it starts raining.

    I do feel pressure to comment a lot, but sometimes just can’t find the time. I do like the idea of a routine, but I agree, no one should stress because they couldn’t tweet something, comment on a blog or post on their set schedule. Thanks for the reminder :)

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Yeah if you’re staying up until midnight the night before you might need to try to change your schedule a bit. I know up here in the northwest the summer months are particularly tough. We know that we have to take advantage of the sunny weather while it’s here.

      Reply
  4. Garrett

    Taking breaks and blogging on my own schedule are the keys with my own blogs. I used to tell myself that I have to make a post every single day and in time I would start to hate it. I think the quality suffered too as I was churning out junk just because I felt I had to.

    Now I am a lot more relaxed about it and have no real schedule. I just make posts when I have something I feel is important to say or show. I haven’t noticed any real negatives in terms of traffic or feedback with this approach and it is much better in terms of lifestyle.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Trying to post everyday is a perfect recipe for blogger burnout. With that approach you put way too much pressure on yourself to have something to post everyday. Unfortunately most of us just aren’t in a writing mood every single day or there are things that come up that take up our time instead. I think aiming for 3-5 posts per week is plenty. I only started doing more than 3 posts per week when I started accepting guest posts regularly.

      Reply
  5. Monique

    Very helpful article. Even over the past few days alone, I have been starting to feel a bit burned out. Therefore, the timing of this post is oddly fitting. Being patient is so necessary throughout the blogging process. We can only do the best we can. Learning to determine when you need to keep pushing and when you just need a break is going to be very detrimental to your overall success. Sometimes taking space is the best thing you can do for your blog. It is much better to come back to blogging feeling motivated and rejuvenated, versus overwhelmed and overworked.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      So very true Monique. When you overwork yourself, it usually eventually shows in your work. Those breaks help you come back with a fresh approach and so much more energy. Sorry to hear you’re going through one of those burnout periods though. It might be time to really analyze the kind of work you’re doing with your blog and at what kind of pace. Taking breaks is a bit of a band-aid fix.

      Reply
  6. bogofdebt

    I get stressed from not having any posts that I can pull from if I can’t write something. I’m trying to fix that slowly–not stressing myself out in the process. I always feel bad in the last week and first week of a month because I have very little free time with the end of the month at work. So when I come home, the last thing I’ll feel like doing is blog stuff. I’ve learned to just take a deep breath and remind myself why I started blogging.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Maybe you could consider accepting guest posts on your blog. That relieves a lot of the writing pressure. I know I always have some guest posts that I can put up if I can’t write something a certain day.

      Reply
    1. Jeremy

      It sure seems like it. I don’t everyone is ever really prepared when they start their first blog. Then once things start rolling, the amount of work just piles up. Before you know it, you just get overwhelmed by it all.

      Reply
  7. Frugal Flip

    My problem at this point isn’t so much burnout as it is time management. I feel that I see everyone just churning out content all the time! It also didn’t help that I worked 75 hours last week. Right now my goal is 2 posts per week (which I know is low on average). If I can do more, that’s gravy.

    Nice post!

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Properly managing time relates pretty close to blogger burnout. It’s usually lack of proper time management that contributes to blogger burnout. Unfortunately there’s not much that can be done when you get stuck working a 75 hour week. In a case like that you just have to willing to be content with some weeks of fewer posts and less off-site marketing.

      Reply
  8. Rebecca

    Great tips! I was feeling blogger burnout last week, so this week, I’m trying to relax and not blog 24/7. I’ll keep these tips in mind. Thanks :)

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      If you were putting in some intense hours, you do have to figure out a more natural balance. It may be as simple as setting aside some hours each day to do something you enjoy.

      Reply
  9. Jessica @ Budget for Health

    I need to apply some of these tips. I was trying to write 4 posts/week and staff write biweekly while working full time. I was less intentional with my husband and felt more obligated than joyful about writing. Three posts per week works for me and I’m able to enjoy writing and love my husband well!

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      There’s nothing wrong with only writing 3 posts per week. Trying to juggle that with a full time job, a husband and staff writing may be limiting your blog marketing time though. As a result you end up sacrificing long term growth for short term profits.

      Reply
  10. Peter

    I get the blogger burnout blues every once in a while. My tried and true remedy is to just take a break for a day or even two, and that usually gets me refreshed and ready to create again. Sometimes you just need a little break. Other times you can take guest posts from others to keep the content rolling, or just work on other things besides writing, like improving your site’s design or functionality.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Good point about switching to other blogging related tasks. I do like to take some time to work on that kind of stuff as a break sometimes too. Just a bit more variety can help a lot. That depends if it’s burnout or more just writer’s block. Sometimes a full break from the computer is needed.

      Reply
  11. Savvy Scot

    Yo! Nice post… I think remembering it is not a race is the most important thing to me. Compromising post quality over quantity was a learning curve. End game in mind :)

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      I think it’s just human nature to treat blogging as a competition. When you know other bloggers who started at the same time, you tend to pay attention to their progress compared to your own. Usually you are comparing the full circumstances when you do that though. Even if circumstances are fairly similar, in the end it doesn’t matter how quickly your blog progresses. You can just put your best good forward and find ways to make the most out of your efforts.

      Reply
  12. Paula Wethington

    Another thought: if a particular topic within the blog content annoys you, then drop it or refocus what you are doing with it! I’m telling the story on a social media blog, but the situation is: I tweaked the content on my financial blog a couple of weeks ago. I was tired of spending so much time on one particular topic as it used to take me two to three hours a week to research and write. I now compile a shorter version of that information in a half an hour. So far, no one has complained.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      For sure, sometimes we can bite off more than we can chew with a certain angle we take. Then you feel obligated to put a ton of time into each post. That extra time isn’t always worth it though. You just have to be willing to change things without fear that the new approach won’t be as successful.

      Reply
  13. Canadianbudgetbinder

    You are right blogging is not a race and it can get overwhelming the more you start to learn about it though. I pace myself now and schedule in my blogging and social networking activities throughout the day. I don’t put my life on hold like I did at the beginning as I was learning so much so fast. I enjoy the blog as it is my hobby but the best part besides the networking is the learning I am getting from it. I always believed that we should never stop learning in life. I love to learn something new everyday and with a blog, you bet I learn 10 new things a day~ Great Post… Mr.CBB

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Yes blogging is a much easier routine when you know less. As you learn more though, you feel obligated to jump on social media, regularly network with other bloggers and just generally do more. So if your blogging knowledge level is fairly low, you don’t want to try to learn too much at once. You need to give yourself time to gradually adapt.

      Reply
  14. Drew @ ObjectiveWealth

    True authenticity in bloggers stands out by a mile, that’s what I look out for. Those who quickly blurt out recycled advice and lists in order to keep up a schedule, just because everybody else seems to be doing the same, shows up in poorly written articles and nothing new of any value. It’s better to wait until you have something important to say; your readers will value that and stick with you no matter what your schedule.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Authentic writing is definitely important, but if you spend too much time on your writing, then enough people won’t find it. I do acknowledge that some guest posts I accept may come across as the recycled advice. With some topics though, it’s just not possible to provide something new of value. I don’t consider that to automatically make that a post that is not useful though. You have to keep in mind that there are people reading a blog who have not been reading dozens of other blogs for months. To those people that recycled advice may provide some very useful information.

      Reply
  15. Veronica @ Pelican on Money

    Thanks for mentions. I know what you mean about burnouts and taking breaks. As you can see from my post today, I had a similar moment. Instead of writing a whole new post I simply re-posted one I did a while back ago that received no attention (even though I thought it would be interesting for people to read).

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      I’ve been considering taking that approach with some of my older posts. Instead I might just put a spin on those topics and use them as guest posts on other blogs. In my opinion, reposting the same article on your blog is not really an ideal strategy since it produces duplicate content.

      Reply
  16. Kim@EyesontheDollar

    This is the best Wednesday one yet. I think you wrote it just for me as we’re heading out tomorrow for Vegas to a conference and it’s our 10 year anniversary. I’m debating leaving the laptop at home. I think that I will. Happy Birthday!.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      I’m glad you enjoyed it Kim. If it’s your 10 year anniversary, there’s no question about it, leave the laptop at home. That is unless your husband loves to gamble and you don’t. Being able to leave your blog unattended for days on end is liberating. Just be prepared for a bunch of catch up work when you get back.

      Reply
    1. Jeremy

      It’s good you take that approach because it is annoying when people don’t have anything to add but still leave a comment just for the sake of it. Then again I do those kinds of comments on link round up and carnival posts. I just try to add a bit extra when they have taken the time to write an intro.

      Reply
  17. Jason @ WorkSaveLive

    You know this well as we exchanged a ton of emails early on, but I was seriously getting burnt out after 3-4 months of blogging. It was really tough to grow it as quickly as I wanted to, and as I began to see some other new blogs succeed, it motivated me to work harder.

    Needless to say I think I’ve found a happy medium. It’s tough to juggle but these days I’m fine with not commenting on blogs if I don’t have the time. It seems to all work out though but I hope to cut back even more here in the near future.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      That’s true that the competition with other bloggers can be good motivation. For some people it becomes unmotivating though. If they can’t seem to keep up, it’s easy to get frustrated and pessimistic. I’m glad you’ve found a happy medium though. That level can take a while to find. Cutting back further would be nice for the sanity, but I’m not really sure how I’ll pull off that transition. So for now I don’t really think about it and just keep on what I’m doing.

      Reply
  18. MoneySmartGuides

    It’s really important to set up a schedule. I too would spend hours in the beginning on my blog and sacrifice other areas of my life. Now that I have a schedule, it’s a lot more manageable. But there are still moments of overwhelmingness. Having a schedule though makes easier to get though those times.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      That would help prevent getting carried away trying to do everything as quick as possible. If you limit yourself to a certain amount of time each day, then you can actually say you’re done at some point and spend the rest of the night relaxing.

      Reply
  19. MakintheBacon$

    The picture with this post is sometimes how I look when I ‘m working on my blog. And that’s just only trying to think of what to write!!! I feel I am suffering from blogger burnout, but I don’t feel I’m even putting the minimal amount of effort a lot of bloggers are putting in. In my case, neither of my jobs are with computers, so its really only when I get home late in the evening, that I get a chance to read blogs and comment on them. I tend to write posts more on the weekends when my mind is more clear and I’m more relaxed. I’m lucky if I make it to posting once a week.

    Thanks for the post. It made me feel better. :)

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Yes many bloggers do have the advantage of being able to sneak in a bit of work during their daytime job hours. So I can see why your schedule would make it a lot tougher. Having such a small window to write content can be tough too. It prevents you from really getting in the flow of writing. You could ask some close blogger friends to provide a guest post to have on hand to use when the writing just doesn’t come to you. The important part is that you don’t put too much pressure on yourself if you do struggle to find time. There will always be more time later.

      Reply
  20. Shilpan

    Happy birthday! Balancing time between your everyday life and blogging is the key to avoid burnout. As you’ve mentioned, blogging is not a race; it’s a medium to exchange thoughts and ideas to share with other like minded people.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      It’s just surprising how many people don’t see it that way. Most seem to be in a rush to be making money as soon as possible. I guess it’s understandable that they want to see a return on all the time they put in, but that can make their blogging a lot more pressured. Ideally they have time to let things gradually develop at a pace that they can manage long term.

      Reply
  21. mycanuckbuck

    Awesome tips as always. I’ve decided I need to just chill and not spend more than an hour a day on it – more than that I feel stressed and unhappy.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      If you feel stressed and unhappy, you definitely need to change things up a bit. It might not necessarily be the amount of time you’re putting in though. It could be more about your specific approach. I know I started feeling a lot happier about it all when I started focusing more on bloggers I really like.

      Reply
  22. CF

    Good post. I think that this advice can be applied to lots of different situations. Even at work, when you’re trying to keep up with everyone else, make deadlines and meet expectations, it’s good to step back, relax and refocus.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      That’s true that some of these tips don’t just apply to blogging. You can get burnt out from all kinds of work. Sometimes it’s just a matter of needing an occasional break, but other times you might really need to work at a more enjoyable company or a more satisfying career.

      Reply
  23. Harry @ PF Pro

    Thanks for the mention. I definitely know what you mean, I try to post 2 times a week but some weeks I just have too much other stuff going on. I don’t depend on my blog for income so I can not write an article or two and nothing really happens :)

    I guess I could write a bunch of posts and use those when I don’t have time to write but that would require a lot of forethought haha

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      With blogging it is definitely best to start when you don’t need income from it right away. That takes so much of the pressure off your back. Instead you can just naturally grow your blog at your own pace. If you ever do suddenly need income from it, at least you would have a solid base developed to build upon.

      Reply
  24. Jefferson @SeeDebtRun

    Blogger burnout is absolutely real.. and like you, Jeremy, I have seen many bloggers come and go since we started 7 and a half months ago.. You absolutely HAVE to pace yourself when it comes to blogging and networking.. You can’t comment EVERYBODY..

    and while we are at it– posting 3 times a week is plenty.. If you have enough ideas to post more often than that.. Then use them to build up an archive for when times get busy.. I have actually unsubscribed to a few blogs that posted more often than once per day, because I just couldn’t keep up.

    moderation is the key to a happy life.. and a happy blog

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      I don’t particularly like the blogs that post more than once per day either. It just clutters up my feed reader and makes it a lot less likely that people will see my comments. So I did the same thing and unsubscribed from blogs like wisebread. It is a good idea to set a posting limit each week and gradually add to the queue. That queue gives you the extra freedom to take time off whenever without your blog going silent.

      Reply
  25. Jordann

    This is a great post! Lately I’ve stopped caring about all of the ‘supposed tos’ and just started doing what I want on my blog. It makes me happier, hopefully my readers like it too.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Congrats on taking on that mindset. Since blogging is all about expressing ourselves in our own personal way, there shouldn’t be any supposed-tos other than basic etiquette. Beyond that, I say anything goes. It’s much more yourself and less forced that way.

      Reply
  26. My Money Design

    I’ll admit that I’ve been feeling the burn-out a bit and have cut my schedule way back. It’s tough, but you gotta live the life that is going on around your screen rather than in it.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      The scaling back is super tough, especially when you’ve built a lot of close connections. I know I’ve felt pretty bad when I had to make a business decision that put aside personal feelings.

      Reply
  27. Edward Antrobus

    I’ve been hit with burnout a couple times since I first started almost 3 years ago. The number one tip would be to know what works best for your. I can bang out a post faster, and have it as good or better quality, in the mornings before work than in the afternoon.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      Great point about finding your optimal time of day. Some people do work much better in the morning or late at night. It’s all about finding your own best routine.

      Reply
  28. Justin @ The Family Finances

    I haven’t really experienced burnout yet. I post three or four times a week with an occasional guest post thrown in. What I have a harder time with is the reading and commenting on other blogs. I try to do this at work on my lunch, but some days I’m too busy to take lunch, which throws my commenting routine out of whack.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      The blogger burnout I was referring to includes stuff like commenting too. As a whole it can all get to be too much sometimes. Only having time during your lunch break at work would really limit yourself.

      Reply
  29. Jen @ Master the Art of Saving

    Great tips for helping us avoid burnout. :-) I’m so far behind and way too much to do, to have time to get burnt out. LOL

    Seriously though, I spend way too much time with blogging tasks. I really need to take a step back and evaluate where my time is going and what’s working and what’s not.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      I think you need to think in the terms of the 80/20 rule where 20% of your efforts result in 80% of your success. There are so many random blogging tasks that can fill up your time. So it’s pretty crucial that you identify where is best to concentrate your time.

      Reply
  30. Miss T @ Prairie Eco-Thrifter

    When I first started blogging I led myself to burn out. I wasn’t realistic with what I could keep up with. I felt this pressure to have to do all of these things. I since realized that I can do things on my own time and things are still ok. My blog is much larger than when I started and I no longer feel burned out.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      It definitely takes some time to establish a solid system that doesn’t burn you out. Early on it’s very easy to be overly ambitious and take on more than you can chew. The sooner you develop an efficient system, the less stressful your blogging journey is.

      Reply
  31. Gil@LearnFinancialEducation

    I think one point in time, most bloggers experienced this burnt out thing. However, it should be temporary not a permanent one. To avoid burn out in blogging, the blogger should take some rest and find other interesting things that he/she can do.

    Reply
    1. Jeremy

      The breaks in between are pretty important but that just provides a temporary escape. Beyond the breaks you also need to find ways to do things quicker and more efficient. Sometimes getting some outsourced help is a lifesaver too.

      Reply

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